Breed-specific legislation in Australia: a cruel mandate imposes big costs

Posted on May 16, 2014March 18, 2021Categories News   Leave a comment on Breed-specific legislation in Australia: a cruel mandate imposes big costs

The City of Monash has spent almost $100,000 defending itself in court cases involving dogs targeted by the breed-specific provisions of Australia’s Domestic Animals Act. Cardinia, a suburb of Melbourne, spent $80,000 on a single case involving a dog that the court later determined should not have been taken. The dog was returned to its owner.[1] Whatever their views of dogs and policies that improve community safety, Monash, Cardinia, and other communities have seen their tax dollars wasted on court … Continue reading “Breed-specific legislation in Australia: a cruel mandate imposes big costs”

American Bar Association (ABA) urges repeal of all breed-specific laws

Posted on August 8, 2012March 18, 2021Categories News   Leave a comment on American Bar Association (ABA) urges repeal of all breed-specific laws

On Monday, August 6, 2012, the American Bar Association (ABA) House of Delegates, meeting at the 2012 ABA convention in Chicago, approved a resolution urging “all state, territorial, and local legislative bodies and governmental agencies [. . .] to repeal breed discriminatory or breed specific provisions.” This comprehensive recommendation is accompanied by an extensive report detailing the legion of problems associated with breed specific regulation, including significant questions of due process; waste of government resources[i]; documented failure to produce safer communities[ii]; … Continue reading “American Bar Association (ABA) urges repeal of all breed-specific laws”

Maryland Court of Appeals’ Decision Unfairly Burdens Dog Owners, Landlords, and Shelters

Posted on May 3, 2012March 18, 2021Categories News   Leave a comment on Maryland Court of Appeals’ Decision Unfairly Burdens Dog Owners, Landlords, and Shelters

The recent Maryland Court of Appeals decision in Tracey v Solesky modifies the common law in Maryland regarding liability for bites attributed to dogs the Court alternately referred to as “pit bull”, “pit bull mix” or “cross‐bred pit bull mix”. The decision establishes a strict liability standard for persons who own, harbor or control “pit bull,” “pit bull mix” or “cross‐bred pit bull mix” dogs, when a dog so labeled injures a person. Evidence Analysis The rationale and sources relied upon by the Maryland … Continue reading “Maryland Court of Appeals’ Decision Unfairly Burdens Dog Owners, Landlords, and Shelters”