Are we creating a culture of helicopter pet parenting? Two studies with implications for the unintended consequence of hypervigilance.

Posted on February 17, 2017March 18, 2021Categories Research & Publications   Leave a comment on Are we creating a culture of helicopter pet parenting? Two studies with implications for the unintended consequence of hypervigilance.

Question of whether people being in urgent need of education about their dogs’ micro behaviors might be pushing people into helicopter parenting of their pets with all the harms that result from over-diagnoses and stress over whether their dogs are behaving appropriately.

Question of whether people being in urgent need of education about their dogs’ micro behaviors might be pushing people into helicopter parenting of their pets with all the harms that result from over-diagnoses and stress over whether their dogs are behaving appropriately.

When you do the math, behavior evaluations flunk

Posted on August 22, 2016March 31, 2021Categories News, Research & PublicationsTags , ,   Leave a comment on When you do the math, behavior evaluations flunk

Article authors demonstrate why when a shelter dog tests positive for dangerous behavior, it is much more likely that the test has failed the dog, rather than the dog having failed the test.

Article authors demonstrate why when a shelter dog tests positive for dangerous behavior, it is much more likely that the test has failed the dog, rather than the dog having failed the test.

How to Use National Canine Research Council’s Website

Posted on August 2, 2016March 18, 2021Categories News, Research & Publications, UncategorizedTags , ,   Leave a comment on How to Use National Canine Research Council’s Website

National Canine Research Council’s website is complete with both familiar & new research and resources. Included in the change is an evolution into a canine behavior science and policy think tank.

National Canine Research Council’s website is complete with both familiar & new research and resources. Included in the change is an evolution into a canine behavior science and policy think tank.

The Telephone, Science, and Dogs

Posted on July 7, 2016March 18, 2021Categories News, Research & PublicationsTags   Leave a comment on The Telephone, Science, and Dogs

In the press and in the academic literature, a complex version of Telephone is played every day. If not diligently and knowledgeably researched, reports in the press and the scientific literature may distort messages contained in the underlying reports they are citing.

In the press and in the academic literature, a complex version of Telephone is played every day. If not diligently and knowledgeably researched, reports in the press and the scientific literature may distort messages contained in the underlying reports they are citing.

Are you happy? Disgusted? Your dog can tell the difference

Posted on August 27, 2014March 18, 2021Categories Research & Publications   Leave a comment on Are you happy? Disgusted? Your dog can tell the difference

Once again researchers at the Family Dog Project in Hungary have confirmed an ability that dog lovers have long suspected in our canine companions. In an ingenious series of experiments the Eötvös Loránd University ethologists demonstrated that dogs can discriminate between human expressions of happiness, disgust, and simply blank indifference. [1] They built on earlier studies which had shown that dogs can tell the difference between smiling and “blank” photos of their owners’ faces, but did not recognize these differences on … Continue reading “Are you happy? Disgusted? Your dog can tell the difference”

Incoherent definitions confound attempts to label dogs as “pit bulls”

Posted on May 7, 2014March 18, 2021Categories Research & Publications   Leave a comment on Incoherent definitions confound attempts to label dogs as “pit bulls”

Most animal shelters continue to assign breed descriptors to dogs whose origin they do not know[1], even though current university research has shown that breed identification based on visual inspection correlates poorly with DNA breed signature, and that observers will disagree with each other when examining the same dog. These difficulties are only compounded when the descriptor itself is subject to different interpretations. A study by researchers in the US and UK examines the question of whether animal shelter workers … Continue reading “Incoherent definitions confound attempts to label dogs as “pit bulls””

No single factor explains barking, growling, lunging and biting behavior in dogs.

Posted on April 30, 2014March 18, 2021Categories Research & Publications   Leave a comment on No single factor explains barking, growling, lunging and biting behavior in dogs.

Dr. Rachel Casey from Bristol University in the UK, and colleagues, recently attempted to estimate the number of dogs barking, lunging, growling or biting – the behaviors they grouped together under the term, aggression[1] — and to see if they could identify decisive causes of such behavior. Of more than 14,000 UK dog owners surveyed, 3,897 replied, answering questions about their dogs’ responses to family members, to unfamiliar persons away from the house where the dog lived, and to unfamiliar … Continue reading “No single factor explains barking, growling, lunging and biting behavior in dogs.”

Neuroscience May Confirm What Many Dog Lovers Already Know

Posted on November 1, 2013March 18, 2021Categories News, Research & Publications   Leave a comment on Neuroscience May Confirm What Many Dog Lovers Already Know

Dog owners regularly attribute emotions such as love and loyalty to their pets, and may be just as regularly dismissed for doing so. The Dog Project, being conducted by Dr. Gregory Berns, a neuroeconomist at Emory University in Atlanta, has detected canine brain activity suggesting that dog owners may have the last laugh. Dr. Berns studies “the neurological basis for individual preferences.” He uses functional MRIs (abbreviated as fMRI) to measure changes in key parts of people’s brains at a … Continue reading “Neuroscience May Confirm What Many Dog Lovers Already Know”

Assumptions about future behavior of shelter dogs seen as food aggressive are unfounded.

Posted on August 30, 2013March 18, 2021Categories News, Research & PublicationsTags   Leave a comment on Assumptions about future behavior of shelter dogs seen as food aggressive are unfounded.

Animal shelters may conduct what they describe as behavioral evaluations of the dogs they receive, in order to discover what they presume will be problem behaviors when the dogs are adopted into new homes. Among the behaviors that evaluations are designed to detect are those labeled “food aggression.” The behaviors described by that term include growling, showing teeth, lunging, snapping or biting, when a person attempts to interact with the dog while it is eating, or to interfere with the … Continue reading “Assumptions about future behavior of shelter dogs seen as food aggressive are unfounded.”

Of Mice and Dogs: Their Personalities May Be Up To Us

Posted on June 17, 2013March 18, 2021Categories News, Research & Publications   Leave a comment on Of Mice and Dogs: Their Personalities May Be Up To Us

Most of us easily acknowledge the likelihood that specific behaviors can be influenced by learning, in ourselves and in other species, including the one closest to us, our companion dogs.  We can learn to tie our shoes, and our dogs can learn to walk next to us. We can even learn rules of etiquette and our dogs can learn to greet people without jumping up. But we also identify ourselves as having overarching traits, as having a fixed personality that … Continue reading “Of Mice and Dogs: Their Personalities May Be Up To Us”